Thursday Doors : 8 June 2017

Alms House, Youghal

Door from the Alms House in Youghal, Co Cork

Over the weekend we went exploring in Youghal, Co Cork – a town about an hour away from my home.    The main street of Youghal, on first glance, is a bit run down with lots of empty shops and derelict buildings, but there’s more to Youghal than first impressions.   The town was buzzing on Sunday as there was a ‘Moby Dick ‘ festival on, as this is where the film Moby Dick was made in the mid 50s.   There was music, food and dancing in the streets!

We decided to explore a little more, and got a walking map from the Tourist Office, and came across some hidden gems, including St Mary’s Cathedral, which is the oldest church in Ireland, with continuous worship since the 13th century.

Youghal, Co Cork

St Mary’s Collegiate Chapel

One of the main benefactors in Youghal was Richard Boyle who was the first Earl of Cork, and lived in Youghal for many years.  He built 6 alms houses in 1601 for 6 retired soldiers, and granted them a pension of £5 per year – probably a princely sum in those days!   The houses were renovated about 20 years ago, and are now used as private dwellings, but the original stonework is still there in places, as you can see, and they look exactly like they looked when first built.

Another view of the alms houses.

Tyntes Castle, Youghal

Tyntes Castle, Youghal

This is the door of Tyntes Castle, called an ‘urban tower house’ and built in the late 15th century, it’s a 4 story residence in the main street, where the gentry lived in earlier centuries.

Tyntes Castle, Youghal

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors

Thursday Doors : 18 May

We have just been on a short trip to the sunshine in southern Spain, the Costa del Sol, and here are a few of the doors we came across.  Most doors that we saw were very ornate, and a lot of them had these wrought iron doors outside the wooden doors, which means the building can be cooler in summer with the wooden door open.

Or how about these ones?

Head on over to Norm’s for more

 

 

Norm’s Thursday Doors :

My doors this week come from the fabulous Muckross House in Killarney, Co. Kerry.  This is a 19th century house built on the shores of the Lakes of Killarney, with magnificent gardens and old trees.   The house was built in 1839, and extensive work was done on the house and gardens in preparation for the visit of Queen Victoria in 1861 .

Muckross House, Killarney

This is the main entrance to the house, which is open to the public, and furnished in the original style – a very grand mansion, but probably not so grand for those living ‘downstairs’ and having to carry everything up two or three flights of stairs from the kitchens in the basement.

 

Muckross House, Killarney

And these are some of the doors from the back of the house – probably a storeroom.

Servant’s Entrance?

Tuesdays of Texture : May 2, 2017

 

Abandoned

On a recent walk around the Lakes of Killarney, we came across this old abandoned ruin, of what was once a fairly imposing stone buiilding, maybe it once was a hunting or fishing lodge for the gentry, on the shores of the lake, with a very scenic outlook.  Now the bushes and ivy have taken up residence there.

Even the doorway is a bit of a challenge, not even suitable for Norm’s Thursday Doors, but check out more textures over at Narami’s blog.

Thursday Doors : A Safe Door!

The Bank, College Green, Dublin

Door of the Night Safe

It’s a door of sorts, one that can only be used if you have the right key.     This photo was taken in The Bank Bar and Restaurant, in College Green, Dublin.    This restaurant was formerly (you guessed it) a bank, in fact there was a bank here since 1892, first the Belfast Bank, and later the Royal Bank of Ireland.   It has been a restaurant since 2003, but has retained many of the original features inside, including the safes and safety deposit boxes downstairs in the vaults.

The Bank website gives the following information on the origins of the building :

The exterior is Franco-Scottish in inspiration and is unique in that it is one of Dublin’s rare examples of Scottish sandstone. The interior, which was once the main banking hall, is a stunning example of merchant power and patronage displaying an extraordinary ornate setting, stained glass ceiling, mosaic tiled floors and spectacular hand carved plasterwork and cornicing.

Inside features of the Bank

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors

Norm’s Thursday Doors : 16 Feb 2017

For this post, my title should be ‘where a door used to be’ as I am featuring some photos from Muckross Abbey in Killarney National Park.

Muckross Abbey, Killarney

The archways in the Abbey at Muckross

This abbey was a Franciscan Friary and was first established in 1448,   The present  ruins include a church with a wide, square tower and fine windows, and a vaulted cloister with an arcade of arches around a square courtyard.

In the middle of the courtyard grows an ancient yew tree, said traditionally to be as old as the Abbey.

Muckross Abbey was the burial place of local chieftains, and in the 17th and 18th centuries the three Irish poets, Geoffrey O’Donoghue, Aodhagan O’Rathaille and Eoghan Rua O’Suilleabhain were also buried here. The graveyard in the grounds surrounding the Abbey is still in use with a number of burials there each year, and in the abbey itself there are vaults of some of the priests and monks buried there.

Muckross Abbey

Muckross Abbey

Linked to Norm’s Thursday Doors

Norm’s Thursday Doors : January 12 2017

Mainz Cathedral

Mainz Cathedral

These are the very impressive doors of the Romanesque Cathedral in Mainz, Germany.    This building is over 1000 years old, and was built around the year 990, in the 10th century.   It’s hard to cast my mind back that far, and hard to believe that this building is still standing and being used as a Cathedral, as originally intended.    The doors are very tall, made of bronze, and date back to the 11th century.

Mainz Cathedral

Here are some views of the outside of the Cathedral, there was some repair work and scaffolding going on when we visited, but it is a very large and interesting building, as you can see.

Mainz Cathedral, Germany

Mainz Cathedral

Mainz Cathedral, Germany

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